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   How Many More Mike Browns are out There?

NEWS INFORMATION

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Parent

News Date

9/25/2005 10:00 am

Author

Media

TIME Magazine

Category

General

Database Record

Entered 9/25/2005, Updated 9/25/2005

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A TIME inquiry finds that at top positions in some vital government agencies, the Bush Administration is putting connections before experience By KAREN TUMULTY, MARK THOMPSON AND MIKE ALLEN IN WASHINGTON Posted Saturday, Sep. 24, 2005 In Presidential politics, the victor always gets the spoils, and chief among them is the vast warren of offices that make up the federal bureaucracy. Historically, the U.S. public has never paid much attention to the people the President chooses to sit behind those thousands of desks. A benign cronyism is more or less presumed, with old friends and big donors getting comfortable positions and impressive titles, and with few real consequences for the nation. But then came Michael Brown. When President Bush's former point man on disasters was discovered to have more expertise about the rules of Arabian horse competition than about the management of a catastrophe, it was a reminder that the competence of government officials who are not household names can have a life or death impact. The Brown debacle has raised pointed questions about whether political connections, not qualifications, have helped an unusually high number of Bush appointees land vitally important jobs in the Federal Government. [snip] The Office of Personnel Management's Plum Book, published at the start of each presidential Administration, shows that there are more than 3,000 positions a President can fill without consideration for civil service rules. And Bush has gone further than most Presidents to put political stalwarts in some of the most important government jobs you've never heard of, and to give them genuine power over the bureaucracy. "These folks are really good at using the instruments of government to promote the President's political agenda," says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University and a well-known expert on the machinery of government.


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