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   Poll Shows Obama Gains Support

NEWS INFORMATION

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Parent

News Date

12/11/2008 10:00 pm

Author

Media

Wall Street Journal

Category

Poll

Database Record

Entered 12/11/2008, Updated 12/11/2008

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Wall Street Journal. "President-elect Barack Obama is entering the White House with an enormous reservoir of goodwill from an American public that is rooting for his success in the face of bad economic times, a new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll finds. The mood presents opportunities as well as perils for Mr. Obama, who confronts a series of challenges amid expectations he will handle them well. Overall, a majority of Americans are confident in Mr. Obama's ability to govern and unify the country, with many who didn't vote for him now seeing him in a positive light. The poll found that 73% of adults approve of the way he is handling the transition and his preparations for becoming president. "So far so good," said Kathleen Broussard, a 25-year-old massage therapist from Dallas. She voted for Republican Sen. John McCain for president, but said that the day after the election she felt a sense of joy about Mr. Obama's victory that hasn't gone away. "I respect him. And we're all praying for the best. We definitely needed a change, and he's definitely that change." Polling indicates that the nation is more unified around Mr. Obama than it was for either Bill Clinton in 1992 or George W. Bush in 2000. Americans say the challenges, too, are greater, with 77% of those surveyed predicting Mr. Obama will face bigger problems than most recent presidents have. So far, Americans are buoyed. Mr. Obama is viewed favorably by more Americans than ever, and three of four say they can relate to him as their president."


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